Canada Travel Diary: Day 7 – 06/04/15

I feel like keeping a journal is becoming a chore. It’s covered with scruffy handwriting, words I can’t even make out due to the hand cramps.

I have no idea where we went today, I took note of a few places we passed, but that’s about it. Bob, Fran and I drove to numerous places to find the wild horses. I got promoted to the front of the car, so I wouldn’t get left behind again, which is also a bonus as I can see out more of windows.

The majority of the day is spent driving in the car do the different locations. Bob said you could drive the length of the UK all the miles we put in. I can see his point, you can drive for miles and miles out here, not passing any towns or houses, whereas back home you would. I mean we have not passed a single gas station out here. I wonder what happens if they run out of fuel?

Thing is, I don’t mind the long drives, as it is something I have always loved; looking out windows, watching the world pass by and keeping a look out for wildlife of course. Thus, this is what I did on this journey.  As soon as we left a whopping great big bird flew over the jeep. Spreading its wings, it soared overhead.

A Bald Eagle. It was huge! And so close, you could see its big menacing beak! It’s a shame I didn’t have my camera out. How unfortunate, as I saw 2 Bald Eagles today and no one will ever believe I’ve seen one now.

En route we saw loads of wolf tracks and when I say loads, I mean loads; I would love to see a pack of wolves out here!

In actual fact we saw a number of different tracks today. Because of the recent snowfall it’s easy to spot. Wolves, Moose, Cougar and Pine Martin were the tracks we saw today, along with a Golden Eagle and a Flicker which is a type of woodpecker.

Back to the journey…

Looking out for signs to give an indication to where we are heading, I noticed we passed Bearberry. Not long after, we pull into a forestry area, and spot three horses immediately close to some trees. The bay stallion looked like he’d been in the wars to protect his mares, scars covering his body. We carry on in this area and come across three more horses, all bays again. They were on the edge of the road in a snowy area, which was great, and then it started snowing. Luckily I managed to get some snaps before it got too heavy. As we left, directly opposite we spotted a chestnut stuck in a power line area, so Fran and Bob opened the fence up so he could find his way out.

Moving on we entered this massive forest and didn’t see horses for what felt like hours. We took various paths and eventually found them in a little valley area where the grass was sparse. The strange was we’d driven past areas with loads of grass, yet no horses! In this area we saw 3 young studs. It was a lovely spot for pictures and created a lovely background with beautiful light. I’m glad they played ball and posed as some of my favourite images come from this area.

Considering the amount of miles we put it, we saw very few horses. It’s funny how they are getting culled because ‘there’s too many’. From about 2pm-5pm we saw none. We even went off-roading up this steep hill, (“Hold onto your hats people” was Fran’s Quote), which was a little hairy, but the view was fantastic.

After a long day I was dropped back at the hotel and rang a Sarah whom moved out here 10 years ago from London. It was recommended I get in touch with her by Bob and Fran so I did that this evening and ended up going out to dinner with her and her family. It was a lovely meal and really nice to eat with people instead of alone.

 

Canada Travel Diary: Day 6 – 05/04/15

My time is slowly coming to an end here, and I don’t want it to. I am really enjoying myself despite the snow and cold. It’s so peaceful out here.

This morning I went for a swim in the hotels pool (I’m not on holiday I promise). It was lovely, I haven’t swum in years and despite me thinking I’ve forgotten how to swim, I still can. Though I am much weaker than I used to be when I was younger. A bonus was I had the pool all to myself too.

On arriving at WHOAS facility’s I pitched in with some chores, cleaning pens and leading the rescue wildies to water before heading out with Gregg.

On the trip out we headed to Bearberry, Ghost and Ya Ha Tinder where I saw this incredible frozen waterfall with a plunge pool at the bottom, it was a challenge to reach but very rewarding it was stunning!

Saw 17 horses in total today and loads of hawks. I had the pleasure of seeing my first elk too. The mountains are huge and vast covered in an array of green conifers, it really is something else.

The recent snowfall meant lots of fresh tracks of wolves etc too!

 

Richmond Park Trip #3

The plan for this post was to link to my previous post in 2014 on my trips to the park…but I can’t seem to find them…Sorry! (I think I probably wrote the blog posts in my head and thought I’d actually written and published the post but turns out I never did…I think this happens a lot!)

One late October Saturday I made my third trip to Richmond Park, London in the hope of taking some autumnal deer photographs. This time I was meeting some fellow photographers arranged through ‘meetup’.

Compared to my other two trips two years ago it was a rather cloudy, dull day and there weren’t as many autumn coloured trees as I was expecting!

The freelance photographer who had organised the trip had already circuited the park prior to our meeting time at 10am so we knew what direction to head in (this was really handy as the first time I went I walked for ages getting lost before finding the deer – haha). We spent a lot of time photographing the deer under the trees in the more wooded areas as it looked like a more natural environment rather than the open grassland areas. Now I have a confession, two years ago I bypassed completely ignoring the deer in the wooded areas as I just figured it was too dark and my images would end up really grainy! Yes two years later I found it a bit tricky and frustrating as the dull day made it even darker but hey I still came away with some great pictures (not blowing my own trumpet I’m just pretty proud of how they came out). Though my favourites taken on this day are still the ones taken in the more open areas!

I was thinking about the different lighting conditions and challenges over the trips I’ve taken and I must say my favourite set of images comes from this trip! I’ll share a few of my favourites from the day! At some point, I’d love to get some sunrise/sunset shots of the deer!

Here are two links to photos taken in 2014…

Long Exposures

Whilst on holiday last week, I decided to have a play with long exposures. I’ve dabbled a bit with long exposures of the past few years but not as much I’d like, for various reasons. One being going out alone in the dark to somewhere with no light pollution with camera makes me nervous, I mean what if someone comes along and steals my pride and joy for example? What am I going to do? It’s not like I’m the bravest and can fight back! (or maybe I’m being overly dramatic) Perhaps when I can drive I’d be more inclined to and just stay by the car.

This year we were lucky to be staying overlooking the sea! At first I thought about walking to the local beach about a 15-minute walk again, but alas the fear was there. Instead, I stayed on the patio in an attempt to get some sea and stars!

The first night didn’t go down overly well as I forgot how hard it is to focus in the dark. After many attempts shining a torch on the nearest bush I called it a night settling on this:

IMG_5437

The following night, it was glorious once again the stars out and the bats flying around under the street lights. I was gasping in awe. Now, this time before it got dark I went out and set my camera up to make sure it was focuses… why did I not think of that before?!

I played around for a bit and got these:

IMG_5619-2IMG_5625

I then headed inside and packed my gear away.

And then this happened.

I’d headed up to bed sometime later and was about to draw my curtains. I looked out the window to find the sky covered in a vast array of star. There was so many more out than what I’d noticed a few hours earlier! So what did I do? I unpacked my gear and set myself up at the window of course!

There I was gazing out the window patiently waiting for the camera to finish taking the picture, when a flash shot through the sky which was quite bright. In a world of my own I shot back to life gasping and muttering to myself…woah was that a shoot star? Well I can say that when I looked at my camera, it was indeed a shooting star.

It’s a shame about the curtain and window in the picture but hey, I got my first shooting star photo!

Later on the week (after two raining days and a cloudy one) I managed to persuade my family to hang around after dinner in the town Looe, for me to try and get some long exposures on the beach and by the harbour. I also had a little play at the other end of town the following night, by a river.

On another note, I have recently ordered an ND filter to have a play around with so once I have that and had the chance to get out and have a go I’ll share that too!

***

If any one has any hints/tips for long exposures please let me know! 🙂

 

 

Canada Travel Diary: Day 5– 04/04/15

“WAIT!”

“STOP!”

“COME BACK!”

The dust kicks up as I sprint frantically through the light brown smog. I scream at the top of my lungs trying to get their attention, waving my arms like a crazed madman. My heart is pumping and my lungs clench under the cold midday air. My throat feels raspy; it hurts. My legs soon tire, and I stand alone, teary-eyed and exhausted. The sound of the engine soon dissipates as it rounds a bend, leaving a falling cloud of dust in its wake.

My last cry for help “Don’t leave me……”

My throat catches, and I feel the cool shiver of sorrow bubble inside.” Don’t cry you idiot, that’s not going to help things. ”

But the truth is I’m scared.

Very scared.

I didn’t come on this trip to be a lone survivor in desolate plains of the Canadian wilderness.

Clutching tightly onto my camera, a million terrible scenarios run through mind. I try to think clearly, of the next course of action when an emergency happens. It’s a difficult thing to do when you’re on the brink of letting your emotions take hold, and turn you into a small ball of a teary mess.

Great, my water’s in my bag…which is now hurtling away in the opposite direction. Talk about icing on the cake.

I start walking. I’ve just been stranded in a Canadian wood, populated by bears, wolves and mountain lions. Never mind what I said in my last post about bear attacks being rare, my mind is nowhere near at ease.

What happens if one attacks?

And eats me?

All the evidence is hidden…..apart from my camera, my shoes and probably some smelly socks!

It’s the middle of the day and the sun is still high in the sky. Luckily, the human eating mammals should be sleeping. SHOULD.

I glance around nervously as I walk; I am a lone female with no survival skills what’s so ever. I don’t even know how to light a fire, let alone make one.

Fact is, sometimes people lost in the wilderness never make it out.

What are you supposed to do? Stop and calm down. Your gut reaction is to panic and when fear or panic rules your mind, it only works against you. The thing is, if people know you’re out in the wilderness and missing, eventually someone will come looking. By moving around you make it harder for the rescue party.

So what did I do? Carry on walking.

I look down at my dirty boots as I scrape their thick rubber bottom against the dry sandy road. Suddenly the silence is broken, and no it is not me whaling like a lost infant. It’s them!

Two grinning faces appear behind the dashboard of the jeep. At this point I don’t even care if it was a joke; I’m just so relieved they’re here!  I am welcomed with the sound of laughter as I clamber into the backseat. I am not impressed at this point, but the over whelming joy of not having to spend the night in the woods allows me to join in with the laughter.

That was a close one…

IMG_6210

One of my favourites

IMG_6229

‘Portero’

 

Canada Travel Diary: Day 4 – 03/04/15

“Don’t worry, there isn’t any grizzlies in these parts”. That’s what Bob said, just before letting me loose to photograph the wild horses that live on the rescue site.

I arrived not long ago when Bob, the president of the society ‘Wild Horses of Alberta Society’, and his partner Fran picked me up from the B&B. They arrived slightly early so I rushed to cram the remainder of my belongings away and run down the stairs with my luggage to meet them. In my rush, I almost slipped up on the wooden flooring.

I would miss the homeliness of the B&B and the city, but I am moving to a new place where the work and the real fun starts.

“Bye Louise, it was nice having you” Arlene the B&B owner hollered down the stairs.

“BYE! Thanks again” I yelled back before letting the door swing shut and walking towards the big red car that awaits.

I haul my luggage into the boot; Bob extended his hand as a greeting and so does Fran.

“Well hop in, ” Bob said. I clambered up into the big car; it was quite a way up for a short person.

We chatted for part of the journey to Sundre, talking about R.Vs, the Canadian domestic life and about the horses of course. I chatted with ease, which surprised me as I’m normally quite shy and don’t say more than ‘Hmm’.

So that how I ended up at the facility to meet the volunteers, the rescued wild horse, and the wild onsite band, much to my pleasant surprise.

This was where I was when Bob said about the bears. If I’m honest, the fact a bear could eat me didn’t cross my mind until he said that. I was actually worried more about the stallion charging at me!

Two types of bears actually reside in Canada. The grizzly bear and the smaller black bear  are both species that are omnivores, which means they eat anything from berries to salmon.

In fact, what are the odds of me being killed by a bear?

Incredibly low in fact, I remember reading in Stephen Herrero’s book Bear Attacks that attacks are events and in North America there are approximately six hundred thousand black bears and sixty thousand grizzlies. Anyway, statistics say in the 2000’s in North America including Canada, U.S, and Mexico the Black Bear killed 15 people and the Grizzly killed 12 in the same period. Not that many when you think about it. In other words, less than 3 people are killed each year in North America.

So there I am. Walking towards the back of the rescue site towards the area where the wild horses are lingering. There are so many trees in the woods, mainly birch. I stand in a clearing, silence. I look up at the tall trees, they’re huge. I walk on the pine cushioned floor littered with dirt and leaves. You would have thought there’d be a fresh, nature smell in the area, but I smell….nothing. I’ve never smelt nothing before. The air is fresh and crisp. The sun filters through the trees creating a dazzling light.

I spot the stallion first. The stallion they call ‘Portero’ which means gatekeeper in Spanish. He is magnificent with this great presence and this beautiful long wavy mane covering his dark eyes. The sun shining over his coat, his muscles rippling. His mares stand behind dozing peacefully and heavily pregnant.

The horses, this place, the silence, is magnificent. I can’t believe I saw the wild horses on my first day and managed to get some stunning photographs.

IMG_6114

Wild stallion known as Socks. My first sighting

IMG_5416

‘Portero’

Canada Travel Diary: Day 3 – 02/04/15

It’s been a hell of a long day, I’m exhausted and it’s only 2 pm. The weather was on my side once again thankfully and this morning was spent at Calgary Zoo.

I suppose one of the upsides to not having a car is walking to the places and being able to stop easily along the way. The walk to the zoo was great once I got away from the main road as it led me along the river.  The river water amazes me; it’s a dazzling aqua blue and crystal clear. It’s magnificent.

One of the benefits I’ve found by travelling solo is I can do what I want and when I want. I can leave the house whenever I want and not have to wait for other people to get ready. Plus, whilst at the zoo, I found I can move around the enclosures in my own time, as I like to read the signs and spend time watching the animals, as usually others don’t like to read and tend to move on as soon as they have caught a glimpse of the animal.

Now that I’d spent the majority of the morning at the zoo and I must say my favourite part was the Canadian Wilds section which is great as they have information on the various habitats, what lives there, and a display of the animals found in the various regions. It really led you on a journey and it was great to see the Canadian Wildlife (even if it was in enclosures).

I did also fall for the photogenic Gorilla in the African section as he/she really posed for the camera, much to the delight of a school class watching. It’s amazing how alike humans they are though one did eat off the floor!

IMG_4947

Photogenic Gorilla

Some brave House Sparrows approached me at lunch and tried to steal parts of my food. Much to their dismay, they were unsuccessful, until I emptied my crumbs.

***

I set out on the one of the bikes from the shed at the B&B and followed the Elbow River Pathway, hoping to make it to Weaselhead Natural Area, an hour’s bike ride away apparently.

This bike felt strange; when turning it moved too quick and felt kind of loose, but it was the only one in the shed my size. At least, the seat was comfy! I’ll go slowly I thought to myself, that way if I fall, it won’t be too bad.

This is so relaxing by the river apart from going up those dreaded hills.  I got distracted by woodpeckers, squirrels and rabbits along the route. I’d been going for quite awhile and had to take many detours away from the river due to erosion and work on the riverbank.

Passing big rich houses like the ones you see in the movies, I drooled, they are lush. I really want to take a peek inside one.

Uh oh….the path ahead is closed and it’s pointing up a very big twisty hill. I am not biking up that. I managed to get a quarter of the way before hopping off and walking to the top. Taking a seat to catch my breath, I look at the view. Wow. Directly below is the blue river, twisting and turning. Behind that, an array of posh houses and mansions, with tall dark conifers and brown land stretching into the distance, until the mountains fill the horizon. What a view.

I carry on biking and stop at a map. I’m half way and I’ve been over an hour. I’m never going to make it in time and it’s starting to get dark. I carry on for a bit and it starts to snow. Great, I’ve come out in a thick fleece and fingerless gloves. I sigh and turn around; I guess I should head back.

Jeez! My legs are killing; it’s a good job I turned around. I ploughed on through the light snow and about 20 minutes from the B&B the snow suddenly got heavier, thicker and more pellet-like. It’s a blizzard.

I’m trembling, frozen and my legs are burning; I want to give up.

I push on, against the wind. My face hurts and can’t feel my fingers. I feel like I’m going to hurl.

I will my legs to bike faster.

Success! I finally reach the B&B. Frozen I fumble around and put the bike away and rush inside for a cup of tea and a nice warm bath.

Note to self: Always take an extra layer, whatever the weather.

5 things I learnt at The Digital Imaging Show

Last Thursday I attended ‘The Digital Imaging Roadshow’. This show travels around areas of the UK and gives a series of Masterclasses each year. I really enjoyed all the talks and I learnt a lot!

So, seeing as there were five talks on the day, I’m going to share one thing I learnt from each masterclass!

Damian McGillicuddy -I Bet you wished you’d brought your brolley

Umbrellas may be the single most overlooked weapons in the photographer’s arsenal. The societies seven-time photographer of the year will demonstrate the power and versatility of the humble brolley by combining classic, contemporary and downright cool lighting techniques.

This talk seemed more tailored to those with studios and portable lights. Though I did learn a number of things in general from this talk one being when shooting a headshot you point the lens at the mouth, if a mid you point at the chest and for a full body shot you point at the stomach.

Charlie Kaufman – Selling, Selling, Selling!

Charlie will inject 25 years of experience in sales into the delegates of this fast paced, fun packed and informative talk.

Well this, certain was fast packed and fun! I did think during this talk I’d nod off because of the subject but actually it was really interesting and upbeat! I think this is one I learnt the most from so will be hard choosing one thing!

The major thing I’d take from this class would be don’t give all images in high res on a CD – as you don’t want to give them too much as overshooting and undershooting is bad! – Generally from photoshoots I come away with anywhere between 200-400 pictures a person which I cut down to 80!

Mark Cleghorn – The Photography Xperience

In this session Mark looks at ways that you can simply move from Bland to Brand with your photography and business.

Another talk I enjoyed! One thing to take away from this talk: Plan every session – Write a shot list, get that creative shot, change accessories, session flow new ideas and always do something different with every client.

Richard Storrs – The Power of Websites

An insight in to the importance of websites for photographers. Why, in today’s world you cannot afford not to have one.

Now, I already have a website so wasn’t sure how much I would take away from this.

If used correctly a website can save time in terms of order processing, taking and making payment, involving and customer contact – I don’t have a shop built into my website at the moment, however it is something I will now look into!

Richard West – Colour Management made simple

Former head of Apple’s Photography Market team in the UK and subsequently country manager for photo plug-in manufacturer Nik Software (now Google). Richard West runs Datacolor in the UK.

Monitor calibration is something I keep seeing pop up in a number of photography groups I am apart of on Facebook. One thing I learnt from this class (and there is a lot) is softproofing! I honestly thought this button in lightroom just showed you what the image looks like on a white background! Not that you can see how the image will be seen on the internet and also using printer profiles to see how it will come out when printed! I tested this out with my printer (I don’t use this to print photos) but if I did they would come out with a horrible blue tint! I then downloaded the printer profiles from the printing lab I use to see the difference – it’s not quite as drastic as the tint but they do come out duller than on screen!